Home The Bois Blanc Island Site
An interactive site for islanders and island lovers
 
 Home  ::  Forum  ::  Album  ::   Calendar  ::  Memberlist  ::  Usergroups  ::  Register 
 Profile  :: FAQ  ::  Search  ::  Log in to check your private messages  ::  Log in 

Hunting Area
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Bois Blanc Island Site Forum Index -> Site/Forum Comments, Questions, Suggestions
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Kyle Gask
Stone Skipper


Joined: 20 Oct 2005
Posts: 12
Location: Brighton, MI

PostPosted: Wed Jan 12, 2011 12:37 am    Post subject: Hunting Area Reply with quote

Hey everyone!

Looks like I am going to be doing some Turkey hunting this spring and wanted to know if anyone had a map of the state land on the island. I know there is a lot but just want to make sure that I am not hunting on someones property. Thank you for your help!

-Kyle
_________________
My life is School, Work, and cars...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
islandnana
Gold Coast Guest
Gold Coast Guest


Joined: 21 May 2002
Posts: 187
Location: Bois Blanc Island, MI

PostPosted: Wed Jan 12, 2011 8:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The last I heard Kyle you can't shoot the turkeys on the island yet. I may be wrong so you might want to check with someone else.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail AIM Address
Kyle Gask
Stone Skipper


Joined: 20 Oct 2005
Posts: 12
Location: Brighton, MI

PostPosted: Wed Jan 12, 2011 8:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

islandnana wrote:
The last I heard Kyle you can't shoot the turkeys on the island yet. I may be wrong so you might want to check with someone else.


I will have to check into that. I was looking at the mad for the areas to hunt and BBI was in that area. Not sure who to contact. Gram?
_________________
My life is School, Work, and cars...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
mikewhite
Resident Royalty
Resident Royalty


Joined: 01 Jan 2003
Posts: 1404
Location: Sand Bay

PostPosted: Thu Jan 13, 2011 8:55 am    Post subject: hunting turkeys Reply with quote

I thought I heard Bill Rutledge say one time that he hunted turkeys on the island. I suppose that still doesn't answer the question, whether it is legal or not though.
_________________
mwhite@wildblue.net
"The more nature you keep, the more nature you'll enjoy." and "It's not who is right, but what is right."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Kyle Gask
Stone Skipper


Joined: 20 Oct 2005
Posts: 12
Location: Brighton, MI

PostPosted: Thu Jan 13, 2011 9:24 am    Post subject: Re: hunting turkeys Reply with quote

mikewhite wrote:
I thought I heard Bill Rutledge say one time that he hunted turkeys on the island. I suppose that still doesn't answer the question, whether it is legal or not though.


Well that is a good sign! Once I find information from a good source I will let everyone know. I am pretty sure it is open because the DNRE had the area of the island open for hunting so it looks like it will be open for the spring hunt. It also gives me another reason to make the trip which I love! haha
_________________
My life is School, Work, and cars...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
mikewhite
Resident Royalty
Resident Royalty


Joined: 01 Jan 2003
Posts: 1404
Location: Sand Bay

PostPosted: Thu Jan 13, 2011 9:46 am    Post subject: Map Reply with quote

Your original request was for a map showing state land. I emailed a state made file to you using the email address supplied on this site. It is an attached PDF file and should be much clearer then the one I just posted on this site. The one posted is a scanned copy of the same picture file sent to you.
_________________
mwhite@wildblue.net
"The more nature you keep, the more nature you'll enjoy." and "It's not who is right, but what is right."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Kyle Gask
Stone Skipper


Joined: 20 Oct 2005
Posts: 12
Location: Brighton, MI

PostPosted: Thu Jan 13, 2011 10:30 am    Post subject: Re: Map Reply with quote

mikewhite wrote:
Your original request was for a map showing state land. I emailed a state made file to you using the email address supplied on this site. It is an attached PDF file and should be much clearer then the one I just posted on this site. The one posted is a scanned copy of the same picture file sent to you.


Thanks Mike! I just got your email and this will help so much! Thank you again!
_________________
My life is School, Work, and cars...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
3 putt
Gold Coast Guest
Gold Coast Guest


Joined: 12 Sep 2006
Posts: 187
Location: BBI

PostPosted: Tue Jan 18, 2011 7:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Turkeys are not doing good on the island. We use to see 50 to 75 at one time. I seen 10 turkeys this winter and we feed everyday. Dont know why, but thier just not doing good.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Uncle Steve
$$ Site Donor $$
$$ Site Donor $$


Joined: 13 Dec 2002
Posts: 389
Location: Big Rapids, MI and Eagle Ridge AKA Red Roof Inn (2006) ... East end BBI

PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2011 6:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wink Coyote population up ??
_________________
" Luck doesn't just happen, we work for it "

Uncle Steve
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Conis
Resident Royalty
Resident Royalty


Joined: 15 Jan 2004
Posts: 2198
Location: My New National ID Forehead Tatoo

PostPosted: Sat Jan 22, 2011 9:39 am    Post subject: Turkeys. Be careful what you wish for. Reply with quote

Turkeys. Be careful what you wish for.

How cool we all thought they were when they first started showing up in the 80's... Somehow their novelty wore off after they populated themselves to the point of hundreds per section of land. Several mild winters and low predation lead to a population explosion.

Sure... they are indigenous to Michigan. And reintroducing them was another stroke of DNR brilliance, as "revenue generating game birds" with little forethought of consequences. Much has changed in Michigan since turkeys were naturally indigenous and naturally scarce at that. With any luck, maybe they will become extinct again. I'd be glad if that happened

What' wrong with Turkeys? Nothing in sparse numbers. They have a niche in nature as scroungers and scavengers, just like Coyotes, Fox, Raccoons, Opossums. At excessive numbers, their effect on other species and natural habitat is devastating... as we have all witnessed over the last 25 years or so. I'll get back around to this.

    The turkeys have had the triple whammy over the last 2-3 years. The deep snow in 08-09 really took them down. No food.

    Coyote and 'coon populations are way up so eggs in nests are getting pillaged.

    A rapid warm up last spring, followed by cold and rain reduced hatching success even further. In years past, a hen would normally have 8-12 poults tagging along by summer. Last summer one or two, and many hens had none


25 years ago, pre turkey era, we had an abundance of pheasants, pats (ruffed grouse), woodcock... Meadowlarks, Whippoorwills, and many other birds that share one trait in common: They are ground nesters. Those species are now scarce if not completely gone now.

Turkeys have keen eyesight and can spot minute movement at considerable distance. They scrounge just like they get scrounged. Coming across a nest on the ground, they will pick eggs and chicks = food. I have seen them do this many more times than once... all totally denied by DNR wildlife biologists when asked about it. What an odd coincidence that these ground nesting species have vanished once the swarms of Turkeys invaded?

Hardwood lots, once abundant in spring wildflowers are now barren. These flowers are the first spring "green" = food. Not only do the turkeys eat them, they root around and destroy the plant's roots. I have seen woodlots so totally disturbed, it looked like pigs had been kept there.

Many farmers in this area became totally fed up with them. In winter, hundreds of turkeys would congregate around open sided corn silos, pecking away at the corn in the silo and scrounging for kernels on the ground. It came down to a serious disease issue because of the turkey droppings. The DNR refused to control the problem, which they didn't see as a problem or else a problem too expensive to deal with... Lets' just say the "three Ss" resolved the problem and turkeys were "removed" by the pickup and front end loader-loads. Then buried so as not to become a coyote bait-pile. which is what they could have been used for and solved another problem as a secondary result. The DNR was fully aware of all of this and didn't intervene.

There has been considerable speculation that the coyote population has exploded simply because the turkey poults provide a constant food source at a time when coyote pups are being born. Poults can't fly so it's easy pickings and plenty of puppy food. So the next entree are fawns chased down by too-many packs of well-fed fat coyotes. Get the food chain picture, here?

Turkeys are similar to a land based version of the White-Breasted Cormorant, another indigenous Michigan bird, that underwent a population explosion with devastation to fish as a result. (If you have followed that). Their populations are somewhat under control now, by intentionally disrupting eggs in nests. And by locals getting fed up with them and taking things into their own hands, just like the farmers did, but only after continued lack of response by the DNR and FWS. Both agencies knew of "local control measures" and turned a blind eye.

Perhaps... if the turkey population has exploded and crashed, and their numbers can be kept in check... after a few decades the ground nesting birds and native wildflowers will make a comeback. Can only hope.

I am all for not messing with Mother Nature. Messing with Nature and making "improvements" seem to be the DNRs justification of their existence, usually with some revenue producing scheme behind it. Invariably it blows up in their face and they refuse to denounce bad policy and decisions. Reintroducing turkeys is a shining example of this. There is a long list DNR train wrecks not relevant here, but similar.

The next time you see a turkey, maybe plug in a few of these insights, into what you are actually looking at. And people are feeding them? WHY? Let the DNR feed them.

Don't step in the droppings. If you do feed them, don't feed deer in the same area. Deer can become infected with bacteria and parasites rampant in turkey droppings. Did the DNR mention this? Unlikely.

Ferrel Pigs are another problem soon to be a big one in Michigan. They are already at epidemic population levels in many southern states. Prolific and not easily controlled. I mention this only because of the old adage " When pigs can fly".

Guess what. They can! They have wings and go "gobble gobble" rather than "oink-oink".

Turkeys may be "game birds" but they are more like huge flying opportunistic disease carrying parasites, and at the expense of many other species.

BBI is an isolated environment. Turkeys can't fly in from Cheboygan. Use this as a clue.
_________________
Remember, half the people you know are below average.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
Rosemary
Bois & Grills Club
Bois & Grills Club


Joined: 23 May 2002
Posts: 233

PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2011 12:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I heard that they taste terrible, too.
_________________
Don't be afraid that your life will end,
be afraid that it will never begin.
~anonymous~

"UNTIL ONE HAS LOVED AN ANIMAL, PART OF THEIR SOUL REMAINS UNAWAKENED"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Conis
Resident Royalty
Resident Royalty


Joined: 15 Jan 2004
Posts: 2198
Location: My New National ID Forehead Tatoo

PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2011 9:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

They taste better than a BF Goodrich but are tougher than a Firestone.

The best way to cook one it to nail it to a board, throw it in the campfire for an hour, pull it out, throw the turkey away and eat the board.
_________________
Remember, half the people you know are below average.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
Rosemary
Bois & Grills Club
Bois & Grills Club


Joined: 23 May 2002
Posts: 233

PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2011 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

good idea
_________________
Don't be afraid that your life will end,
be afraid that it will never begin.
~anonymous~

"UNTIL ONE HAS LOVED AN ANIMAL, PART OF THEIR SOUL REMAINS UNAWAKENED"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Kevin Gibbons
Resident Royalty
Resident Royalty


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 924
Location: cheboygan, mi

PostPosted: Thu Jan 27, 2011 12:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Conis you got to be kidding me. I love wild turkey, use a turkey cooker, nice and tender good taste. Not as much meat as a demostic turkey. You do have to take off the freathers though don't forget. I think you forgot. Haven't seen you in a few years Conis I hope everything is going all right for you.
_________________
kevin gibbons
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Kevin Gibbons
Resident Royalty
Resident Royalty


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 924
Location: cheboygan, mi

PostPosted: Thu Jan 27, 2011 12:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh by the way Conis I see why you don't like the turkey you need to eat the turkey and not the board. The board tends to be a little tough. And it is real dry and leaves splinter comming out your A--. You need to change that diet.
_________________
kevin gibbons
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Conis
Resident Royalty
Resident Royalty


Joined: 15 Jan 2004
Posts: 2198
Location: My New National ID Forehead Tatoo

PostPosted: Thu Jan 27, 2011 3:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I shoot em with an arrow, and just leave it in 'em for a spit. Cook em whole, guts, feathers and all, right over the open campfire.

Once the fire dies down and they are done to a golden black, they drop into the fire and keep it going for another hour or so. Just don't breathe the smoke, is all.
_________________
Remember, half the people you know are below average.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
blue72
Lake Mary Muse
Lake Mary Muse


Joined: 16 Feb 2008
Posts: 431
Location: Ann Arbor

PostPosted: Thu Jan 27, 2011 11:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, put em on a arrow over a camp fire and start drinking. Once that bird hits the fire, you'll eat anything, feathers and all. One and only time I remember having island turkey was our first christmas on the island. Just like eating a greasy turkey. But man was it cool. Oh wait, that was a goose. Never mind. We were still in shock because the old man went out and chopped down the most beautiful Xmas tree we had ever seen. Got it home, and he realized it was too tall. So he cut the top off. WHAT? Sparty still drinks to the prize tree that turned out to be the most pitiful thing you've ever seen. For those of you that were there, Chuck Gibbons' line in the play that year was, " not that one, it's too scrawny". Well, we were living it.
_________________
There are 350 varieties of shark, not counting loan and pool.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Kevin Gibbons
Resident Royalty
Resident Royalty


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 924
Location: cheboygan, mi

PostPosted: Fri Jan 28, 2011 9:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The only trouble with your turkey Conis with an arrow. You can't shoot a bow. So you probaly got a crow and had that over the camp fire. And of course the beer cover the taste up. And Blue Balls can't tell the difference between turkey and groose. He still thinks of Chrismas trees.
_________________
kevin gibbons
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
blue72
Lake Mary Muse
Lake Mary Muse


Joined: 16 Feb 2008
Posts: 431
Location: Ann Arbor

PostPosted: Fri Jan 28, 2011 9:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Groose? You study phonetics at The BABBS Institute? And I've seen you shoot at crows. At least Conis had something left to eat. We had to find yours with a metal detector. Barely a feather left....
_________________
There are 350 varieties of shark, not counting loan and pool.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Conis
Resident Royalty
Resident Royalty


Joined: 15 Jan 2004
Posts: 2198
Location: My New National ID Forehead Tatoo

PostPosted: Fri Jan 28, 2011 9:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Could have been a cormorant. Maybe a sea gull.

If i don't have an arrow, I use a sharp stick and harpoon 'em.
_________________
Remember, half the people you know are below average.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
Kevin Gibbons
Resident Royalty
Resident Royalty


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 924
Location: cheboygan, mi

PostPosted: Fri Jan 28, 2011 10:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Conis do you still have a place on the Ausable. I don't think it is spelled right
Or did you sell it.
_________________
kevin gibbons
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Conis
Resident Royalty
Resident Royalty


Joined: 15 Jan 2004
Posts: 2198
Location: My New National ID Forehead Tatoo

PostPosted: Fri Jan 28, 2011 10:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

On the Pigeon, just south of Afton, 7-8 miles east of Indian River.

Like to sell it, been on the market 3-4 years. Not inclined to give it away.

Things are beginning to turn around so maybe better luck this year.
_________________
Remember, half the people you know are below average.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
mikewhite
Resident Royalty
Resident Royalty


Joined: 01 Jan 2003
Posts: 1404
Location: Sand Bay

PostPosted: Sat Jan 29, 2011 7:54 am    Post subject: Turkey history Reply with quote

A little turkey history.
Turkeys have been introduced to the island twice. The first introduction was a bunch of hand reared wild turkeys. They acted just like chickens. I can't remember what decade it was. Maybe the 60's or the 70's. They would go from door to door looking for hand outs. People did feed them quite a lot which didn't help with the go wild thing. It only took a few years and they were all gone.

Now comes Kevin Gibbons telling us how they taste and all. Could there have been some kind of correlation between the disappearance of those turkeys and the appetite of the islanders? What do you say Kevin! It has been a long time since those days, tell us the story. The Gardner's may have some input on this subject also.
_________________
mwhite@wildblue.net
"The more nature you keep, the more nature you'll enjoy." and "It's not who is right, but what is right."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Kevin Gibbons
Resident Royalty
Resident Royalty


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 924
Location: cheboygan, mi

PostPosted: Sat Jan 29, 2011 8:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes I remember feeding them suckers can't say I liked it though. They would come I don't remember 10- 12 at a time for there hand out. Then for a while every time they came in there wouldn't be as many. But it seems that the coyote population would be up. I think this time the coyotes are up too. But there is a lot more turkeys. I think they have a chance. And for your info Mike I have never eaten a wild turkey off Boblo. I have eaten them from around cheboygan though, and just in the last frew years. We have a lot of turkeys around here where I live in the spring and summer. Good hunting in the spring here.
_________________
kevin gibbons
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Conis
Resident Royalty
Resident Royalty


Joined: 15 Jan 2004
Posts: 2198
Location: My New National ID Forehead Tatoo

PostPosted: Sat Jan 29, 2011 10:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's a question for you:

Given a choice: Would you prefer to have more Deer or more Turkeys?

Just the facts:

There is a correlation, especially in an isolated environment Like BBI with limited natural food supply, supplemented by "un natural" winter feeding to sustain populations.

Coyotes are the "middlemen".

If Turkeys, deer and coyotes were left un hunted and unfed during the winter, ( as in a 100% wild area) sooner or later, there would be a natural balance affected mostly by winter severity which limits natural food supply. That isn't what is happening.

Coyotes can't catch a mature flying turkey or adult deer (except in deep snow). They are opportunists. Turkey poults make excellent coyote puppy chow. The timing is perfect. More coyote pups survive and the turkey population is kept in check.

Coyote population levels depends strictly on food supply. Turkey populations will explode unless controlled by predation.

So... by feeding Turkeys and sustaining them at levels above normal winter attrition, basically the Coyotes will have more to eat come spring and raise larger litters.

More coyotes= fewer fawns survive in the spring as a secondary effect.

What would happen if Turkeys, deer or Coyotes were taken out of this equation?

No deer? There would be no deer and fewer coyotes.
No Turkeys? There would be fewer coyotes and more deer.
No Coyotes? there would be more deer and a Turkey population explosion the likes of which create problems you can't imagine.
No Deer and No turkeys? Coyotes would be very scarce.
___________________________________________________
That's exactly what happened around these parts.

25 years ago, we had the largest deer herd of any county in Lower Michigan. Coyotes were virtually non existent.

Turkeys were introduced and they populated themselves to the point of insanity, at the expense of all other ground nesting birds. No predators.

That was followed by a population explosion of Coyotes having an abundant food supply in the spring when litters were being raised.

That was followed by our deer herd being reduced by 90% as a direct result of abundant Coyotes feasting on fawns.

I believe the Coyote population is now crashing since deer and turkey populations have both been decimated. I haven't see a rabbit in 5 years, just coyote tracks around my yard every morning.

Simplified conclusion: I would prefer seeing more deer around. For that to happen, there will need to be far fewer Coyotes. For that to happen, there will have to be far fewer Turkeys as a food source.

Locals around here still enjoy feeding the Turkeys. The preferred method is a pile of corn over a muskrat trap.

The novelty has worn off and turkeys just aren't appreciated any more. The long term effects have been nothing but negative.
_________________
Remember, half the people you know are below average.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Bois Blanc Island Site Forum Index -> Site/Forum Comments, Questions, Suggestions All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
Page 1 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot post calendar events in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group